英訳サンプル
Japanese-English Translation Sample
JETS




栄光の架け橋

Bridge of Glory

There were tears I didn’t show to anyone.
There were tears I shed with nobody noticing.
My path has never been smooth, but
It’s the path I definitely walked along.
Still in the way to my dream I envisioned at that time.
The dream I felt like abandoning many times.

Getting through many days, I have reached here.
So, I have only to keep going without hesitation
Toward the bridge of glory…

There were nights I couldn’t sleep, feeling chagrined.
There were nights I shivered in fear.
Even when I was about to run away, getting fed up with everything and giving up,
I remember, many people supported me in carrying on.
Beyond sorrow and hardship, there exists the light for each of us.
Let’s go. All we have to do is to start off without turning back.
Toward the sky filled with hope…

There were tears I didn’t show to anyone.
There were tears I shed with nobody noticing.
Getting through many days, I have reached here.
So, I have only to keep going without hesitation
Toward the bridge of glory.
For the endless journey.
To the bridge to your heart.


日本語原稿 (original text)

 広島市の西はずれ。
 とある小さな神社のすみの小屋に老人は横たわっていた。75歳。爆心から1キロの自宅で被爆。天井が落ちてガラスの破片で大けがをした。三日目に県下の実家に帰ったが、40度の高熱、めまい、血も混じる嘔吐、脱毛、ついには歯も抜け、出血が止まらず、体中に紫色の斑点ができて苦しんだ。その年の十月になって、やっと治まったが、今度は起きるとふらふらする。
 果物屋の店を焼かれたあと、近くの闇市で露店の店を出したが、体がついて行けず、数年後には店じまいしてしまった。そのころいっしょに被爆した妻は、白血病で死亡した。失対事業に出ている長男は、親父に財産がないのだから面倒をみる必要はないという。けんかもした。次男、三男のところを転々としたが、それもいつか冷たくされて長続きしなかった。
 4年前、日赤病院で「白血病です。原爆症だから入院が必要です」と勧められて、二年半、原爆病院のベッドで暮らした。「そのころは血が足りなくて、心臓が息苦しうて、かなわんかった」という。
 不幸せはなお続いた。原爆病院の風呂に入ったとき、小さな石鹸の上に足をのせて転び、ひどく腰を打って、神経痛にもなった。
 退院はしたものの、もう行くところもない。知り合いを頼って、この、ひと気もあまりない社殿のすみに身をよせた。貧血と神経痛の治療に、一週に一度、原爆病院に行くのがせいぜい。あとはただ横になっている。病院が遠いので、入院させてくれと何度か頼んだが、「今はベッドがいっぱいだ。空いたら入院させてあげよう」、そういわれて、再入院の日を待ち焦がれている。
 いっそ養老院へ、とも思ったが、「息子さんがいるのだから、よく相談して・・・」、病院の係はそういった。「だが、息子になんか相談する気にもなれない」と小声でつぶやいた。

朝日新聞社(1967)、原爆・500人の証言、pp.120-121


英訳サンプル (translation sample)

 An old man is bedridden in a hut at a corner of a small shrine on the western outskirts of Hiroshima City. He is 75 years old. He was exposed to the radiation of the atomic bomb in his house located 1 kilometer from the hypocenter. The ceiling collapsed and he was injured by shards of glass. On the third day after the atomic bombing, he moved to his parents’ house in the same prefecture, but he suffered from a high fever of 40 degrees Celsius, dizziness, vomiting blood, and hair loss. Then, he lost his teeth, his bleeding was unstoppable, and purple blotches appeared on his entire body. In October of that year, his symptoms finally subsided, but he reeled when he stood up.
 After his fruit store was burned, he opened an open-air shop in the nearby black market, but his body was not able to endure hard work, and so he closed the shop several years later. Around that time, his wife, who was also exposed to atomic radiation, died of leukemia. His eldest son, who was working in an unemployment relief project, said, “My father has no money, and so I don’t need to take care of him.” They quarreled. He lived in his second and third sons’ houses, but the sons became aloof, and he left their houses.
 Four years ago, a doctor at the Japanese Red Cross Hospital recommended, “You have leukemia. This is an atomic-bomb disease, and so you need to be hospitalized.” Then, he spent two and a half years on a bed of Genbaku Hospital. He mentioned, “Around that time, I lacked blood, and my heart was agonizing, it was intolerable.”
 His misfortune continued. In a bathroom of Genbaku Hospital, he stepped on a small bar of soap and slipped, and injured his lower back. Then, he suffered from neuralgia.
 He was discharged from the hospital, but he had no place to go. He relied on an acquaintance, and moved to a desolate shrine pavilion. All he can do is to go to Genbaku Hospital once a week for the treatments for anemia and neuralgia. Other than that, he just lies on his bed. The hospital is located far from his residence, and so he asked for hospitalization several times, but hospital staff replied, “Currently, our beds are fully occupied. When a bed becomes vacant, we will allow your hospitalization.” So he is awaiting his second hospitalization.
 He thought of entering a nursing home, but staff said, “You have sons, and so please consult with them…” He muttered, “But, I don’t feel like consulting with my sons.”

The Asahi Shimbun Company (1967), Atomic Bombs--Testimonies of 500 People, pp.120-121


日本語原稿 (original text)

 二児の母、生活も一応安定していると、テキパキと質問に答えてくれた広島の主婦(34歳)も、孤独だった。
 女学校時代、勤労奉仕に動員された広島駅前で被爆した彼女は、母と三人の弟を同時に失った。かろうじて助かった父親も数年後に死んだ。ただ一人残され、親がわりに面倒をみてくれていた姉も、不幸のうちに死んでいった。
 結婚するとき、夫の周囲には被爆者との結婚に反対する空気が強かったが、夫はそれを押し切ってくれた。その愛情にこたえる意味でも、愚痴や不平はこぼすまいと、つとめて快活に振舞ってきた。被爆以来、けだるさがぬけたことがない病身だが、お産のとき以外は床についたこともない。
 それなのに、ある日、夫の親たちがもらした一言はこたえた。「孫が弱いのは、嫁が被爆者だからではないか」というのだ。このときも、彼女は黙っていた。 そんなとき、心の底を打ち明けて、思い切り泣くことができる実家があれば、どんなによいだろう。せめて、姉が生きていてくれたなら・・・。
 彼女には、張りつめた心を和らげる息抜きの場所がない。やさしく理解ある夫に恵まれたけれど、夫も所詮被爆者ではない。そこには、おのずから壁がある、と彼女は考えて、ひとり心にしまっておく悩みも多い。実家のお墓参りにも、夫を誘わず、そっと一人ででかけるのだ。
 彼女も8月6日の原爆記念日に平和公園の集会に出掛けて行ったことがあった。しかし、そこの光景は、彼女にはお祭り騒ぎと見えた。慰霊碑の前にそなえられた線香も花も、よそから来た人がむちゃくちゃにしてしまっているようだった。だから、彼女はこの日を避け、比治山の下にある実家のお墓へ行くのにも、終戦記念日でお盆の8月15日を選んでいる。
 原爆記念日に爆心地で行われる式典の騒がしさをきらうのは、被爆者たちの共通した心理のようだ。

朝日新聞社(1967)、原爆・500人の証言、pp.195-196


英訳サンプル (translation sample)

 A housewife (34 years old), mother of two, from Hiroshima was also lonely as she responded to the question crisply saying that her life was stable at the moment.
 When she was a student at a girls’ school, she was assigned to a labor service and was exposed to radiation from the atomic bomb in front of Hiroshima Station, to which she lost her mother and three younger brothers at the same time. Her father managed to survive the atomic bomb, but died several years later. Her older sister, the only person she had left, cared for her, but she too died tragically.
 When she was going to be married, people surrounding her husband strongly opposed him marrying a bomb victim, but her husband pushed forward. To answer his love, she has been cheerful, determined not to whine or complain. Since the exposure to the radiation, her poor health causes her weariness, but she has never been bedridden except for during childbirth.
 Despite all this, her parents-in-law made a distressing comment one day. They said, “We think the reason why our grandchild is so sickly is because the wife is an atomic bomb victim.” At that time, she remained silent. In moments like these, how nice it would be if she had her parents’ home to return to so she could pour out her soul and cry her eyes out. Or at the very least, if only her older sister was still alive…
 She has no sanctuary to relieve the strain on her soul. She has been blessed with a gentle, thoughtful husband, but he is still not an atomic bomb victim. Therefore, she feels a distance between them, and tends to refrain from confiding in anyone about her worries. When she visits her family grave, she quietly leaves alone, without asking her husband to come with her.
 Once, she went to a gathering in Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on August 6, which is the Atomic Bomb Memorial Day. However, the scene of the gathering seemed like a bustling festival, and it seemed to her that the incense sticks and floral tributes placed in front of the memorial monument were ruined by the visitors from other regions. Because of this, she avoids this day, and visits her family grave at the foot of Mt. Hiji on August 15, which is both the anniversary of the end of the war and the Bon holiday.
 It seems that all of the victims of the atomic bomb hate the bustle of the ceremony held at the epicenter of the atomic bomb on the Atomic Bomb Memorial Day.

The Asahi Shimbun Company (1967), Atomic Bombs--Testimonies of 500 People, pp.195-196


日本語原稿 (original text)

 当時師範学校の事務職員だった。学校で被爆した。校舎は燃え、外で傷ついた生徒があとからあとから学校にきました。自宅は爆心から一キロ足らず。妻と長女(五歳)、次女(三歳)、生まれたばかりの三女はつぶれた家の下敷きになり、通りかかった中学生に掘り出されたそうです。だが、長女はガラスの破片で大けが。妻や子を大村市の海軍病院で見つけ出したのは被爆後三日目でした。妻と、長女と三女は死にました。
 残った次女は、弟夫婦が郷里の熊本に引き取ってくれたが、髪は抜け、顔色も悪く近所の子供から「青ナス、ピカ子、ハゲ」とはやしたてられても泣けないほど弱い体でした。次女を手元におくため、再婚し、次女はやっと中学校にはいって元気を取り戻しました。高校を卒業したあと、洋裁技術を学んでデザイナーになり、東京で上級の洋裁技術を学ぶかたわら、仕事をするため上京しました。結婚相手が見つかった、と手紙で知らせてきましたが、間もなく「被爆者だということがわかって相手の両親が反対している、あきらめる」という手紙が来ました。勝気な娘だけに、どんな気持ちでいることか、忘れていた原爆の恐ろしさをあらためて思い知らされました。だが、じっと我慢する以外に道もなさそうです。

朝日新聞社(1967)、原爆・500人の証言、p.56


英訳サンプル (translation sample)

 I was working in the office of a teacher’s college when the atomic bomb fell. The college itself burned down, and students who had been injured outside poured into the college, one after the other. My house was less than 1 kilometer from the hypocenter. My wife and three daughters, the eldest aged five, the second aged three, and the youngest a newborn, were trapped under the house when it collapsed. A middle school student passing by dug them out, but my eldest daughter was severely injured by shards of glass. The third day after the bombing was when I found my wife and children at a naval hospital in Omura. My wife died, along with my eldest and youngest daughters.
 My brother’s family in my hometown of Kumamoto took care of my surviving second daughter, but her hair fell out and she became very pale. The neighborhood children teased her, calling her “green eggplant,” “atomic girl,” and “baldy,” but she was too weak even to cry. In order to keep my daughter close by, I remarried. She finally managed to get into a middle school and got better. After graduating from high school, she learned how to make dresses, became a designer, and moved to Tokyo to work and study advanced dressmaking skills. She wrote me a letter saying she had found a would-be husband, but wrote again shortly afterwards, saying, “His parents found out that I am an A-bomb survivor, and are opposing our marriage. I’m giving up.” The torment she went through brought me face-to-face once again with the horror of the atomic bomb, all the more so because she is such a strong-willed girl. But it seems there is nothing I can do but bear it silently.

The Asahi Shimbun Company (1967), Atomic Bombs--Testimonies of 500 People, p.56


 

 

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